LMS usage data and value

Warger (2003) (amongst others) makes the claim Best yet, the learning materials and student progress data that accumulate through use of the CMS become an ever-increasing source value to institutions of higher education. Questions that arise Does the progress data actually provide anything useful for organisations? Is it the only source of such data? What about logging into the computer […]

Evaluating the drivers for LMS adoption

Coates, James and Baldwin (2005) identify/propose 5 drivers behind the adoption of LMS Means of increasing the efficiency of teaching Promise of enriched student learning The drive of new student expectations Competitive pressure between institutions A response to massive and increasing demands for greater access to higher education A culture shift towards the control and regulation of teaching The questions […]

Is pedagogical the only lens

Christian Dalsgaard in a 2006 paper suggests Social software has initiated discussions about the extent to which tools should be separated or integrated in systems (see Levine 2004; Blackall 2005; Cormier 2005; Wilson 2005; Siemens 2005; Anderson 2006a; 2006b). However, the discussion will find no answer, unless it is placed within a context of pedagogy. Use and organization of tools […]

LMSes mostly for administrative purposes

The OECD report “E-learning in Tertiary Education: Where do we stand?” says that universities have primarily used LMSes for adminstrative purposes and that LMSes have, so far, had a limited impact on pedagogy. There are three potential avenues for exploration in that finding Is it actually true? Some of the surveys I saw reported in the ASCILITE’2006 proceedings seem to […]

Rationale for the Web 2.0 Course Site approach

Pittard (2004) talks about the UK government’s plans for e-learning (my bad description). It includes the following It prioritises seven strategic action areas that are necessary to embed elearning effectively across all sectors: leading sustainable e-learning implementation; supporting innovation in teaching and learning; developing the education workforce; unifying learner support; aligning assessment; building a better e-learning market; assuring technical and […]

Rationale for the Web 2.0 Course Site approach

Pittard (2004) talks about the UK government’s plans for e-learning (my bad description). It includes the following It prioritises seven strategic action areas that are necessary to embed elearning effectively across all sectors: leading sustainable e-learning implementation; supporting innovation in teaching and learning; developing the education workforce; unifying learner support; aligning assessment; building a better e-learning market; assuring technical and […]

SaaS, Consumer products, shadow systems and e-learning

In a recent post I commented on the trend around how consumer driven computing is driving the development of “software as a service”. In particular, pointing to an article from the Economist that talked about how Arizona State University was using Google Apps to host email accounts for their students. What I want to do here is to link this […]

Collaboration, Design and Innovation

A nice quote for REACT comes from Campbell, Gibson and Grammlich (2005) Like Albion & Gibson (1998), who maintain that individual faculty, sharing innovative teaching methods, can encourage others ‘to acquire the insights which will enable them to adapt their own practice’ (p. 1), we believe that faculty engagement in a design process provides a catalyst to change in understanding […]

Software as a service – Google apps for your domain

The Economist magazine ran an article on Dec 19th, 2006 which is sub-titled – “Consumer technologies are invading corporate computing”. The main story is about the head of IT at Arizona State University and his adoption of Google Apps for Your Domain which includes Google Apps for Education. The Apps For Education site has a page which includes quotes from […]

Social capital, REACT, Trust – misc resources

This post is going to be a holding place for a range of resources that will be connected with my fuzzy thoughts around how to establish greater trust and reciprocity (maybe social capital) amongst academics and the staff who support them in developing their teaching. Whitworth A (2005). The politics of virtual learning environments: environmental change, conflict and e-learning. British […]

Social capital – outcome and aim

The following comes from ‘Lessons for Education: Creating a Learning System’ (Hargreaves, 2000). It talks about social capital and the role it might play in innovations in higher education. In particular, I believe it has connections with the work on Webfuse and my thesis/ISDT (Jones and Gregor, 2006). Evidence for this is the following quote from a CQU staff member. […]

Adoption of innovations and the "not invented here" syndrome

A lot of educational innovations are reported to be prevented/plagued with the “not invented here” syndrome that prevents adoption. One perspective on this is that this is blame allocation by the producer of the innovator. i.e. it’s not my fault, but the fault of those recalcitrant adopters, they are rejecting my idea because of sheer bloody-mindedness. Going through the book […]

Underpinnings for the REACT approach

Knowledge Management in the Learning Society is a book from the OECD that examines the issues in and around education due to the changes in society – the learning society. On skimming through it there is a great deal that could be used to provide some theoretical underpinning for the REACT approach to staff development around learning and teaching …the […]