Podcast for presentations at the PLEs & PLNs symposium

The following basically tells the rationale and approach used to create a (audio) podcast of the presentations from the Personal Learning Environments & Personal Learning Networks Online symposium on learning-centric technology. I don’t know if anyone else has already done this, but just in case will share. If you don’t want to be bored by

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Cooked course feeds – An approach to bringing the PLEs@CQUni, BAM and Indicators projects together?

The following is floating an idea that might be useful in my local context. The idea The idea is to implement a “cooked feed” for a CQUniversity course. An RSS or OPML feed that either students or staff or both can subscribe to and receive a range of automated information about their course. Since some

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Some potential updates to BAM – a step towards breaking the LMS/CMS orthodoxy

The initial design and use of the Blog Aggregation Management (BAM) system was, in part, designed to try out approaches that leverage the protean nature of information technology. A major part of this is a move to something different, and hopefully better, than the current, broken e-learning orthodoxy within universities that is stuck on the

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Down with the cookie-cutter LMS: the Edupunk ideology and why integrated systems might go away

Edupunk as a term has been circulating since May last year. D’Arcy Norman has posted the YouTube video from below with a couple of folk talking about Edupunk, including Jim Groom the guy who originated the idea One point agreement amongst the participant is that Edupunk arose because a lot of people were frustrated with

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Reliability – an argument against using Web 2.0 services in learning? Probably not.

When you talk to anyone in an “organisational” position (e.g IT or perhaps some leadership positions) within a university about using external “Web 2.0” tools to support student learning one of the first complaints raised is How can we ensure it’s reliability, it’s availability? Do we have as much control as if we own and

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