BIM and BAD

This post arises from two events today The ASCILITE’2014 call for papers came out today and I’m thinking about a paper I might submit. The first #edc3100 assignment is due today and my use of BIM has struck a unique problem that I need to solve. The third is that I’m a touch fried from

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Ateleological travels in a teleological world: Past and future journeys around ICTs in education

In my previous academic life, I never really saw the point of book chapters as a publication form. For a variety of reasons, however, my next phase in academia appears likely to involve an increasing number of book chapters. The need for the first such chapter has arisen this week and the first draft is

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Alan Kay and some reasons why the educational technology revolution hasn't happened

While reading a recent post from Gardner Campbell I was taken by a quote from Alan Kay The computer is simply an instrument whose music is ideas A google search later and I came across this interview with Kay for the Scholastic Administrator magazine. The article is titled “Alan Kay still waiting for the revolution”

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Nobody likes a do-gooder – another reason for e-learning not mainstreaming?

Came across the article, “Nobody likes a do-gooder: Study confirms selfless behaviour is alienating” from the Daily Mail via Morgaine’s amplify. I’m wondering if there’s a connection between this and the chasm in the adoption of instructional technology identified by Geoghegan (1994) The chasm Back in 1994, Geoghegan draw on Moore’s Crossing the Chasm to

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The McNamara Fallacy and pass rates, academic analytics, and engagement

In some reading for the thesis today I came across the concept of McNamara’s fallacy. I hadn’t heard this before. This is somewhat surprising as it points out another common problem with some of the more simplistic approaches to improving learning and teaching that are going around at the moment. It’s also likely to be

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The grammar of school, psychological dissonance and all professors are rather ludditical

Yesterday, via a tweet from @marksmithers I read this post from the author of the DIYU book titled “Vast Majority of Professors Are Rather Ludditical”. This is somewhat typical of the defict model of academics which is fairly prevalent and rather pointless. It’s pointless for a number of reasons, but the main one is that

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