Reliability – an argument against using Web 2.0 services in learning? Probably not.

When you talk to anyone in an “organisational” position (e.g IT or perhaps some leadership positions) within a university about using external “Web 2.0” tools to support student learning one of the first complaints raised is How can we ensure it’s reliability, it’s availability? Do we have as much control as if we own and

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The gulf between users and IT departments

Apparently Accenture have discovered “user-determined computing” and associated issues. The definition goes something like this Today, home technology has outpaced enterprise technology, leaving employees frustrated by the inadequacy of the technology they use at work. As a result, employees are demanding more because of their ever-increasing familiarity and comfort level with technology. It’s an emerging

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From scarcity to over abundance – paradigm change for IT departments (and others)

Nothing all that new in this post, at least not that others haven’t talked about previously. But writing this helps me think about a few things. Paradigms, good and bad A paradigm can be/has been defined as a particularly collection of beliefs and ways of seeing the world. Perhaps as the series of high level

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Dealing with "users", freedom and shadow systems

Apparently Accenture have discovered “user-determined computing” and associated issues. The definition goes something like this Today, home technology has outpaced enterprise technology, leaving employees frustrated by the inadequacy of the technology they use at work. As a result, employees are demanding more because of their ever-increasing familiarity and comfort level with technology. It’s an emerging

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The missing ground rule for Enterprise 2.0

In his MIT Sloan Management Review article, “Enterprise 2.0: The Dawn of Emergent Collaboration”, Andrew McAfee cites two “intelligent ground rules” that people building Enterprise 2.0 technologies are following Making sure the applications are easy to use. Avoiding any preconceived notions about categories or structure by building tools that let these aspects emerge. I see

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