Quotes from Snowden and the mismatch between what univeristy e-learning does and what it needs

For the PhD I’m essentially proposing that the current industrial model of e-learning adopted (almost without exception) by universities is a complete and utter mismatch with the nature of the problem. As a consequence of this mismatch e-learning will continue to have little impact, be of limited quality and continue to be characterised by 5

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How to improve L&T and e-learning at universities

Over the last week or so I’ve been criticising essentially all current practice used to improve learning and teaching. There are probably two main prongs to my current cynicism: Worse than useless evaluation of learning and teaching; andUniversities are using evaluation methods that are known to be worthless and/or can’t get significant numbers of folk

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Patterns for e-learning – a lost opportunity or destined to fail

In the following I reflect on my aborted and half-baked attempts at harnessing design patterns within the practice of e-learning at universities and wonder whether it was a lost opportunity and/or a project that was destined to fail. This is written in the light shed by the work of a number of other folk (Google

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Getting half-baked ideas out there: improving research and the academy

In a previous post examining one reason folk don’t take to e-learning I included the following quote from a book by Carolyn Marvin the introduction of new media is a special historical occasion when patterns anchored in older media that have provided the stable currency for social exchange are reexamined, challenged, and defended. In that

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On the silliness of "best practice" – or why you shouldn't (just) copy successful organisations

The very idea of “best practice” is silly. In any meaningful complex activity the idea of simply copying what someone else did is destined to fail because it doesn’t seek to understand the reasons why that best practice worked for them and what are the differences between “them” and “us”. This post over at 37

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Seven principles of knowledge management and applications to e-learning, curriculum design and L&T in universities

I’ve been a fan of Dave Snowden and his work for a couple of years. In this blog post from last year Dave shares 7 principles for “rendering knowledge”. For me, these 7 principles have direct connection with the tasks I’m currently involved with e-learning, curriculum design and helping improve the quality of learning and

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