A command for organisations? Program or be programmed

I’ve just finished the Douglas Rushkoff book Program or be Programmed: Ten commands for a digital age. As the title suggests the author provides ten “commands” for living well with digital technologies. This post arises from the titular and last command examined in the book, Program or be programmed. This particular command was of interest

Continue reading A command for organisations? Program or be programmed

The nature of user involvement in LMS selection and implementation

Given what know (see the below) about the importance of people to the implementation of information systems and also to learning and teaching, how would you characterise the involvement of uses in the selection and implementation of an LMS at most universities? What impact does it have? The importance of people There has been significant

Continue reading The nature of user involvement in LMS selection and implementation

Nobody likes a do-gooder – another reason for e-learning not mainstreaming?

Came across the article, “Nobody likes a do-gooder: Study confirms selfless behaviour is alienating” from the Daily Mail via Morgaine’s amplify. I’m wondering if there’s a connection between this and the chasm in the adoption of instructional technology identified by Geoghegan (1994) The chasm Back in 1994, Geoghegan draw on Moore’s Crossing the Chasm to

Continue reading Nobody likes a do-gooder – another reason for e-learning not mainstreaming?

Wicked problems and the need to engage with differing perspectives

In writing the last post, I had the opportunity re-read the Wikipedia article on wicked problems. This quote struck a chord with me Rittel and Webber coined the term in the context of problems of social policy, an arena in which a purely scientific-rational approach cannot be applied because of the lack of a clear

Continue reading Wicked problems and the need to engage with differing perspectives

Two types of process and what university e-learning continues to get wrong

I should be writing other things, but there’s a wave amongst some of the “innovation bloggers” at the moment that I wanted to ride for the purposes of – once again – trying to get those driving university e-learning (and learning and teaching more generally) to realise they have something fundamentally wrong. They are using

Continue reading Two types of process and what university e-learning continues to get wrong

From theory to intervention: Mapping theoretically derived behavioural determinants to behaviour change techniques

The following draws on principles/theory from psychology to guide thinking about how to incorporate “data” from “academic analytics” into an LMS in a way that encourages and enables academic staff to improve their learning and teaching. It’s based on some of the ideas that underpin similar approaches that have been used for students such as

Continue reading From theory to intervention: Mapping theoretically derived behavioural determinants to behaviour change techniques

css.php