Situated shared practice, curriculum design and academic development

Am currently reading Faegri et al (2010) as part of developing the justificatory knowledge for the final ISDT for e-learning that is meant to be the contribution of the thesis. The principle from the ISDT that this paper connects with is the idea of a “Multi-skilled, integrated development and support team” (the name is a

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Implications of cognitive theory for instructional design

The following is a summary/reflection of Winn (1990), the abstract follows This article examines some of the implications of recent developments in cognitive theory for instuctional design. It is argued that behavioral theory is inadequate to prescribe instructional strategies that teach for understanding. Examples of how instructional designers have adopted relevant aspects of cognitive theory

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Improving university teaching – learning from constructive alignment by *NOT* mandating it

The problem Most university teaching is crap. Too general, too sweeping? Maybe, but based on my experience I’m fairly comfortable with that statement. The vast majority of what passes for teaching at Universities has a number of really significant flaws. It’s based more on what the teaching academic is familiar with (generally based on the

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Using a blog for course design foult sessions

I’ve bitten the bullet and have decided to use WordPress blog to support the 6 hour orientation to course analysis and design I’m supposed to run next week. It’s probably going to be much more work than I should or planned to put in, but so far it’s been fairly easy. It may be worthwhile.

Good teaching is not innate, it can be "learned" – and what's wrong with academic staff development

The title to this post is included in a quote from Kane, Sandretto and Heath (2004) The research team, comprising two teacher educators and an academic staff developer, embarked upon this research confident in the belief that good teaching is not innate, it can be learned. With this in mind, the project sought to theorise

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Somethings that are broken with evaluation of university teaching

This article from a Training industry magazine raises a number of issues, well known in the research literature, about the significant limitations that exist with the evaluation of university teaching. Essentially the only type of evaluation done at most universities is what the article refers to as “level 1 smile sheets”. That is student evaluation

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