A proposal for fixing what's broken with ed tech support in some universities

This paper analyses the outcomes of what a small group of academics (myself included) attempted to do to develop the knowledge/capability to develop effective learning for hundreds of pre-service teachers via e-learning. That experience is analysed using a distributive view of knowledge and learning and illustrates just how broken what passes for ed tech support/academic

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Some stories from teaching awards

This particular post tells some personal stories about teaching awards within Australian higher education. It’s inspired by a tweet or two from @jonpowles Some personal success For my sins, I was the “recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Quality Teaching for the Year 2000”. The citation includes in recoginition of demonstrated outstanding practices in teaching

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Situated shared practice, curriculum design and academic development

Am currently reading Faegri et al (2010) as part of developing the justificatory knowledge for the final ISDT for e-learning that is meant to be the contribution of the thesis. The principle from the ISDT that this paper connects with is the idea of a “Multi-skilled, integrated development and support team” (the name is a

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Nobody likes a do-gooder – another reason for e-learning not mainstreaming?

Came across the article, “Nobody likes a do-gooder: Study confirms selfless behaviour is alienating” from the Daily Mail via Morgaine’s amplify. I’m wondering if there’s a connection between this and the chasm in the adoption of instructional technology identified by Geoghegan (1994) The chasm Back in 1994, Geoghegan draw on Moore’s Crossing the Chasm to

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Oil sheiks, Lucifer and university learning and teaching

The following arises from a combination of factors including: Mark Smithers blog post Selling solar panels to oil sheiks; Listening today to an episode of All in the Mind on When good people turn bad; and My own growing interest in distributed cognition and related issues as ways to improve learning and teaching within universities.

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