Improving teacher awareness, action and reflection on learner activity

The following post contains the content from a poster designed for the 2017 USQ Toowoomba L&T celebration event. It provides some rationale for a technology demonstrator at USQ based on the Moodle Activity Viewer. What is the problem? Learner engagement is a key to learner success. Most definitions of learner engagement include “actively participating, interacting,

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Introducing the Moodle Activity Viewer (MAV) & digital reno

What follows are the resources associated with a workshop being run at the University of Southern Queensland. As the title suggests, the aim is to get USQ folk started using the Moodle Activity Viewer to explore usage of Moodle activities and resources, and to briefly introduce the idea of digital renovation. Apart from the presentation

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Implications and questions for institutional learning analytics implementation arising from teacher DIY learning analytics

David Jones, Hazel Jones, Colin Beer, Celeste Lawson, Implications and questions for institutional learning analytics implementation arising from teacher DIY learning analytics, To appear in the proceedings of the 2017 Australian Learning Analytics Summer Institute (ALASI 2017) Abstract Learning analytics promises to provide insights that can help improve the quality of learning experiences. Since the

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Exploring options for teacher DIY learning analytics

A few of us recently submitted a paper to ALASI’2017 that examined a “case study” of a teacher (me) engaging in a bit of DIY learning analytics. The case was used to drawing a few tentative conclusions and questions around the institutional implementation of learning analytics. The main conclusion is that teacher DIY learning analytics

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Learning analytics, quality indicators and meso-level practitioners

“failure” (CC BY 2.0) by tinou bao When it comes to research I’ve been a bit of failure, especially when measured against some of the more recent strategic and managerial expectations. Where are those quartile 1 journal articles? Isn’t your h-index showing a downward trajectory? The concern generated by these quantitative indicators not only motivated

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Understanding systems conditions for sustainable uptake of learning analytics

My current institution is – like most other universities – attempting to make some use of learning analytics. The following uses a model of system conditions for sustainable uptake of learning analytics from Colvin et al (2016) to think about how/if those attempts might be enhanced. This is done by summarising the model; explaining how

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Helping teachers "know thy students"

The first key takeaway from Motz, Teague and Shepard (2015) is Learner-centered approaches to higher education require that instructors have insight into their students’ characteristics, but instructors often prepare their courses long before they have an opportunity to meet the students. The following illustrates one of the problems teaching staff (at least in my institution)

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The perceived uselessness of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) for e-learning

Below you will find the slides, abstract, and references for a talk given to folk from the University of South Australia on 1 October, 2015. A later blog post outlines core parts of the argument. Slides Abstract In a newspaper article (Laxon, 2013), Professor Mark Brown described e-learning as a bit like teenage sex. Everyone

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It's not how bad you start, but how quickly you get better

Wood & Hollnagel (2006) start by presenting the Bounded Rationality syllogism All cognitive systems are finite (people, machines, or combinations). All finite cognitive systems in uncertain changing situations are fallible. Therefore, machine cognitive systems (and joint systems across people and machines) are fallible. (p. 2) From this they suggest that The question, then, is not

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