Patterns for e-learning – a lost opportunity or destined to fail

In the following I reflect on my aborted and half-baked attempts at harnessing design patterns within the practice of e-learning at universities and wonder whether it was a lost opportunity and/or a project that was destined to fail. This is written in the light shed by the work of a number of other folk (Google

Continue reading Patterns for e-learning – a lost opportunity or destined to fail

Reliability – an argument against using Web 2.0 services in learning? Probably not.

When you talk to anyone in an “organisational” position (e.g IT or perhaps some leadership positions) within a university about using external “Web 2.0” tools to support student learning one of the first complaints raised is How can we ensure it’s reliability, it’s availability? Do we have as much control as if we own and

Continue reading Reliability – an argument against using Web 2.0 services in learning? Probably not.

Common sense (the things we take for granted) is the big obstacle for innovation

Wesley Fryer has a post summarising a talk given by Sir Ken Robinson. I’m pulling out a few relevant quotes/recollections for later use. Update: One of the comments on Wesley Fryer’s post points to video of Sir Ken giving a similar talk in another venue. Common sense and innovation Common sense (the things we take

Continue reading Common sense (the things we take for granted) is the big obstacle for innovation

Frameworks and representation – tidy versus messy

I’m a fan of frameworks and taxonomies. Also known as theories for understanding (Gregor, 2006). It’s the understanding part that I like. They provide, or at least good ones do, a leg up in understanding difficult concepts. As Mischra and Koehler (2006, p 1019) say Having a framework goes beyond merely identifying problems with current

Continue reading Frameworks and representation – tidy versus messy

css.php